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king_143
01-15-2004, 08:30 PM
Friends,
My prof gave a lot of Technical papers,articles ... to read. I dont understand most of them or what they are talking about. I never read a technical article or paper when I was in India, I always used text books ... Did you people face the same problem and how did you over come it. Please help me .

arumugam57
01-15-2004, 10:00 PM
Maamu..
Poda vennai nu antha papers ellathayum professor moonjila vitteri maamu.

sabeshan
01-15-2004, 11:11 PM
Poda vennai nu antha papers ellathayum professor moonjila vitteri maamu.

romba nalla advice kodukkareenga aaru... oruthar uruppadanum nu aasai padaraaru neenga enna da nna...

suryalover
01-15-2004, 11:36 PM
HI!!

If you cant understand the paper atleast try to understand few key words in that paper!!

That will help a lot...

Read over again and again...

You will know atelast few key words in that paper...

Regards,
Surya

gsatnan
01-16-2004, 04:44 AM
its the first few papers u wld find it difficult as u dont have much experience as surya said note down the key words then read the paper couple more times... when ur reading ur 3rd and 4th u wld find it easier to understand

vasan
01-16-2004, 05:16 AM
One of the ways that works for me is:

If you are studying a topic, trace a undergrad level book that is totally about this subject, and trace a grad level book that at least covers major issues of this topic. Inevitably there will be words, and definitions that these people will not bother explain. These books will serve as sources of reference.

For a given topic, before reading papers that deal with particular results, locate a 'REVIEW' article, paper that deals with a bit of history and outlines major results. This will get you familiar with the main issues, difficulties, ways people are studying it (approaches), and some really key results.

Then give a quick reading of the papers. Its best to use a index card to catalog the name and ref details for the paper, and keywords, and your own summary of what that paper contains. You can buy these index cards in your local book store. Once you have done that, you will have a broad over view of what you papers you have.

Write a brief say 5 page summary of all you know (in points, its not an essay more a list of stuff you have learned).. And then, you can really take the plunge. By now you know which papers are really have something to say, and take a few of them that are relevant, and pour over them in detail - line by line, equations by equation. Once you become utterly familiar with one or two papers, (for me, its about 5 to 10, I am a bit dull.. so I need more..) then, reading rest of them will be easy.

All this will take time. Keep a good record of what you are learning. Use a note book to keep your (daily) chronological comments. Above all, don't think you can master it in a week. That would only lead to frustration. Hurry up but don't be hasty. Also remember to discuss what you learned with your advisor. They do point in right directions - at least once in a way...

I also hope you find a good 'senior' in the lab or a mentor which goes a long way in over coming the initial troubles..

Good luck !!

katteri
01-16-2004, 11:39 AM
The best way to read a paper is to first read the abstract, then introduction and then conclusion this gives a clear idea of what the paper deals with.
As u gain experience u can find which paper to read and which to not...
Its not necessary to read the entire paper...the objective(it depends y do u read that paper) of reading the paper is mostly to understand the current situation and then extract information.

katteri
01-16-2004, 11:42 AM
Use a highlighter to mark the areas u find fascinating.....once u read the paper u need to categorise under topic/under relations to ur work...
Also if u prepare a page reportcon u r own words on that paper , it will be helpful at leter stages.....bcos after some time u forget wht the paper deals with

arumugam57
01-16-2004, 02:29 PM
kingu..

Enakku therinju "Maha Kavi Bharathiyaarukku " bangalore-le rendu software companies irunthutchu. Antha kaalathulaye. Avaru ellam Technical papers paditchaa vazkayila mele vanthaaru. Konjam yositchu paaru. :think::think::think::think::t hink: Vazkayila munneranumnaa technical papers mattum illey , news papers kooda padikka thevai illey.

rajanand
01-17-2004, 06:54 PM
news papers mattum padichhaa podhathu konjam "yellow" (PM me if you want some..:-)) papersum padikkanaum ..you know what I mean..

rajanand
01-17-2004, 06:55 PM
andha kaalathila Thiruvalluvare idhai solli irukkar..oru thani paal pottu..thirikkural has some of the most yellowish contents you can find in "literature"

sabeshan
01-17-2004, 07:07 PM
thirikkural has some of the most yellowish contents you can find in "literature"

Brother raj anand, enna solla vareenga neenga?

king_143
01-17-2004, 10:25 PM
If you are studying a topic, trace a undergrad level book that is totally about this subject, and trace a grad level book that at least covers major issues of this topic. Inevitably there will be words, and definitions that these people will not bother explain. These books will serve as sources of reference.



Vasan,

Thank you, I will follow this , I think this should help me understand some of it. The idea of keeping a note of what I read is important thank you for telling me that.

mcoond
01-24-2004, 11:34 PM
first of all, try to collect basic information about the topic which u will be working on. just bcoz the prof gave u papers doesnt mean that all will be used. after knowing the basics, read through the papers and try to go in for key words and look the meanings of those in order to understand what the author of the paper is trying to present. once you do this for one or two papers, u will understand rest of them pretty easy.
best of luck